Marble Boy and Stick Girl

MARBLE BOYby Michelle Lynn Senters
289 words

 

(Because the story is art dependent, direction is offered throughout the text simply to give an idea of possibilities. Endpapers are filled with line drawings from real children and include the first name and age of the artist.)

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Once upon a piece of paper, there lived a Marble Boy and a Stick Girl. They lived all alone in the big, empty world.
There was nothing to do and nothing to see.
And because they had no ears, there was nothing to hear.
Life was quite boring for Marble Boy and Stick Girl until…

(Two pieces of paper laying side by side, Marble Boy and Stick Girl are unaware of each other. MB is a circle with a face. SG is the typical stick figure. Both faces have simple, but expressive eyes, nose, and mouth.)

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…they found each other.
They became best friends.

(Need visual catalyst here. Perhaps students begin sitting next to one another and portraits see each other.)

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One day, Marble Boy and Stick Girl saw the big boys and girls, living in lands of color and detail.
It was all so beautiful.

(The papers with MB and SG are near a bulletin board filled with children’s drawings, showing various levels of artistic development. MB and SG are filled with wonder.)

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Marble Boy and Stick Girl agreed it was time to grow up and find their place in the world. Stick Girl brought along two pencils with good erasers.
And so, they began their journey…

(SG holds both pencils. A simple line depicting the ground appears on each paper.)

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…and encountered problems right away.
Marble Boy and Stick Girl couldn’t hear one another and although he rolled as fast as he could, Marble Boy just couldn’t keep up.

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Stick Girl helped him out and Marble Boy was quite pleased with the results.

(SG leans across her page to draw arms, legs, and ears on MB. MB can now hold his own pencil. SG draws ears on herself.)

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They continued their journey but learned that growing up was hard.

(Failed attempts at adding detail to pictures. Legs too long, head to large, etc. Erasure marks, ripped papers, tape, broken pencil, etc. Crumpled up pieces of paper nearby.)

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They considered giving up and returning to their big, empty, boring world when…

(Continued problems and failure.)

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…the sun came out and a rainbow appeared in the sky.
Marble Boy and Stick Girl danced and sang, for they finally knew they were on the right path.

(Rainbow is made of crayons laid out between both sheets of paper. MB and SG begin to add color to their pages, including depictions of a sun on each page.)

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As they continued their journey, Marble Boy and Stick Girl discussed the important things of life.
They talked about their likes and dislikes.

(Kindergarten “fill in the blank” worksheets, filled in with children’s writing. “I like ________. I don’t like ________. MB and SG are more detailed. SG has a full body with clothes. MB turns into a stick figure, but still reminiscent of original drawing. New elements are added, including objects such as ice cream or puppies.)

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They shared about their families.

(Kindergarten worksheet titled, “My Family”. Beginning attempts to label pictures with arrows, ie. “Mom. Dad. Me. Brodr.” Continued addition of detail and color including: background, clothing, environment, sky.)

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They told stories about their lives.
Each day, they changed and discovered new things.

(Beginning attempts to write a “life-story”. Invented spelling. Continued artistic development.)

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And then, it finally happened.
Marble Boy and Stick Girl looked at each other and realized they had grown up…

(Highly detailed drawings. Each paper shows depictions of MB and SG as best friends.)

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and found their place in the big, beautiful world.

(Highly detailed drawings of Marble Boy and Stick Girl are on the bulletin board with other Kindergarten drawings OR photograph of real students holding their drawings.)

(Page 32: Chart displaying the “Stages of Children’s Artistic Development” by Viktor Lowenfeld and Betty Edwards, including examples of children’s work.)


Michelle Lynn Senters
1110 Dancing Horse Drive
Colorado Springs, CO 80919
(719)466-0368
michellelynnsenters@gmail.com